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POST OFICIAL: FALLOUT 3(Actualizado 21-03-08)

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Innominado Genos

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Ya, pero no responden a la cuestión: Si me hago actor porno en esta versión, se me pagaran royalties, por películas vendidas :D


No se, no se; cada vez me huele más a tufillo, como paso con The Fall (solo espero estar equivocado) O:)

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Monseñor PARIETINAE UMBRA

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Pienso que sería mejor que en vez de corta pegar las entrevistas kilométricas, dejaras el enlace, más que nada para que no se pierdan las respuestas de los usuarios entre tanto texto.

Explico por doquier que en su día, presencié una paloma en el cielo; y tras ella el cielo se descorrió, permitiendo en su esplendor, mis pupilas se prendieran. Bendito sea Dios, María Santísima.

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varga Saitama

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IGN

FALLOUT 3 Mejor rpg del E3

MASS EFECT finalista

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GAMESPOT

FALLOUT 3 MEJOR RPG DEL E3

Finalistas

Fable 2 (X360)
Lost Odyssey (X360)
Mass Effect (X360)
The Witcher (PC)

FALLOUT 3 MEJOR JUEGO DE PC

Finalistas
BioShock
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare
Crysis
World in Conflict

FALLOUT 3 FINALISTA MEJOR JUEGO DEL E3


GAME CRITICS AWARDS

FALLOUT 3 Nominado MEJOR JUEGO DEL E3
MEJOR JUEGO DE PC
MEJOR RPG DEL E3

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Fodel Gran Lobo Sif

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The Rybicki Maneuver

When to praise and when to criticize: a how-to guide

 

By Brother None

 

I admit it, I'm no Elder Scrolls fan myself.

Roguelike RPGs just aren't my genre and while I've enjoyed limited playtime with the different iterations the series has had over the years, I've never been hooked, nor really interested until Bethesda studios purchased the Fallout license. At that point, it seemed like a good idea to pay more attention to their press coverage than I would've normally done.

 

The (p)reviews were unanimously impressive, generally a sign of a durably classic or alternatively a good game that'll wow you out of your pants the few times you play it. I can't claim my personal experience playing through Oblivion matched up with what I had read in the previews or reviews. More importantly, there's something odd that's been going on more recently, concerning this title.

 

The first sign of a paradigm shift on the horizon was PC Zone's top 101 games of all time (ref), where they placed Morrowind (#4) above Oblivion (#13) with the note Ooh, aren't we controversial? Yes, but constant bickering among the PCZ team has left the Vvardenfell lobby victorious. The argument runs thusly: Morrowind is a better game than Oblivion, if only for the things that Bethesda sacrificed in their pursuit of making the latter that bit more action-orientated.

 

That looks odd when you compare it to the opening of their review of Oblivion (ref): Magesterial. That's the word we're looking for. Morrowind can take the plaudits for laying the groundwork and scrubbing out the rules of location linearity in role-playing, but The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion takes that model, streamlines it, seamlessly integrates exhilarating combat, smothers it in beautiful graphics and takes both Tamriel and the art of role-playing to an unprecedented new height.

 

So which one is it?

 

Morrowind just laid the groundworks for Oblivion or Oblivion loses out to Morrowind on the basis of being more action-orientated? It can't be both, so what causes the difference in opinion between these two pieces?

 

And there we arrive at the central point of this article; the Rybicki Maneuver. In short the maneuver means that as long as your opinion on the product actually matters towards the game's sales, don't be too critical. The moment criticism doesn't matter anymore or, even better, criticism can be used to say "they won't do this again", do a 180 and suddenly claim the flaws you didn't mention in your review should be obvious to anyone.

 

A good example and the source of the maneuver's name (with apologies to Joe Rybicki, but the Rybicki Maneuver just sounds better than, say, the Butts Maneuver) is 1up's Fallout 3 preview penned by Joe Rybicki (ref):

but unlike Oblivion, the third-person view appears to be a viable option for actually, you know, playing the game

 

And this is significant, because Fallout 3 will place a much greater emphasis on conversing with non-player characters than Oblivion did. Sure, you could talk to all 1,500 or so NPCs in Oblivion, but few of them have anything interesting to say

 

Karma is a sliding scale, and the developers wanted to make sure the game could accommodate all styles of play rather than being limited by an Oblivion-style good-or-evil dichotomy.Additionally, quite a few Fallout 3 previews had factual mistakes. Examples

He spent an hour playing the most brilliant First/Third Person Shooter (...) I've seen in a long time (ref)

It should come as no surprise that the team at Bethesda are fans of the original series. Back in 1997 [originally read 1987 - ed], while working on their own RPG, Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall, they fell in love with Fallout. (ref)

With your trusty .22 rifle in hand, you can take potshots at the spiders, with a chance of hitting a body part (such as a leg, to slow it down, or an antenna to try to make it go berserk and attack his friends). (ref)

And before you start saying "Van Buren" remember that that game, too, was made almost ten years ago. It would not be the same game today. (ref)

 

His colleague on 1up gave Oblivion a 9.0 (ref). He didn't talk about the viewpoint at all, the only problem he notes with NPCs is the voice-acting, not limited dialogue, and no mention of any limited good-or-evil dichotomy. Is the person who wrote the 1up review of Oblivion worse at his job than Rybicki himself? I doubt it. And the reviewer took his time to point out flaws, but oddly completely different flaws than Rybicki did.

 

But surely that's just one-time deal...

 

Apparently not. While a number of Fallout 3 previews skipped over comparisons with Oblivion wholesale or kept praising Oblivion on the same tone as in their Oblivion reviews (and I applaud their consistency), a number went with the Rybicki Maneuver. Note that all these juxtapositions either show the site directly contradicting its own review or omitting to mention the flaws it sees when previewing Fallout 3 in its original (p)review of Oblivion:

 

Bearing in mind the AI routines of the NPCs, which did seem more life-like and engaged in more meaningful actions than in Elder Scrolls IV - ActionTrip on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

Oblivion is populated with 1,000 NPC's. Unlike in some other single-player games, the life of the NPC's doesn't stop once the player has left the area. They continue to live their lives even with you out of the picture, with the help of Radiant AI. Each of them is given a basic schedule of events to follow throughout each virtual day. They will shop, go to church, engage in conversation, hunt and even steal. This will all depend on their character traits which are initially decided on by the developers as well as the course of events that takes place in the game. The whole thing is mind-boggling to even think about let alone make. - ActionTrip on Oblivion (ref)

 

One of our biggest worries was the dialogue. Oblivion, as much as we love it, isn't exactly the greatest example of NPC banter. Bonkers looping conversations with women talking in men's voices about a Grey Fox are just about dismissible in the Elder Scrolls world. - Eurogamer on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

The actual interactions you have with the NPCs are generally well-handled, though. Using a basic topic/question-based conversation system, you get the chance to grill almost everyone you meet, giving Oblivion the feel of one of those old-school adventures where you end up making progress almost as much by being plain nosey and inquisitive as your actions. - Eurogamer on Oblivion (ref)

 

You'll also be struggling with moral dilemmas through voiced NPC dialogue choices. The number of NPCs in Fallout 3 is about 300 (as opposed to Oblivion's 1000), so Bethesda has put alot more alcohol and devtime into making their individual A.I. more realistic and natural. Instead of NPCs walking around doing very simple tasks talking basic gibberish, they will roam with more personalized agendas and socialize with other people about topics that interest them. Who needs those flesh-based friends anyway? - Gamerevolution on Fallout (ref)

 

Thanks to the game's touted "radiant A.I." system, the cityfolk are impressively lifelike, going to their jobs, visiting the tavern, and returning to their homes to sleep. They'll even make chit-chat with each other if they meet up in the street (which, like the rest of Oblivion, can lead to yet more quests if you happen to eavesdrop.) Shops do feel oddly empty, however, as nobody seems to buy anything except you, and many characters will forget their previous interactions when they revert to the "standard" daily routine. Small potatoes, though, considering how much A.I. is in here. - Gamerevolution on Oblivion (ref)

 

And Bethesda really wants to make choices count in this game, much more than it did in Oblivion. After all, in Oblivion you could pursue every quest in the game and be all things to all people. - Gamespot on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

Also, the way the quest system is structured in Oblivion is a huge improvement to the way quests were handled in Morrowind. - Gamespot on Oblivion (ref)

 

And, thankfully, the horrid level scaling of Oblivion has been more or less phased out. - GGL on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

For all the excellence within this game, there are some flaws. Firstly there is the annoying and unpredictable issue of crashing. Both of my test machines experienced random crashes to desktop. (...) The other issue is more understandable and can be largely forgiven. The NPC interaction suffers from some rather illogical and disjointed verbal exchanges. - GGL on Oblivion (ref)

 

The animations all looked very impressive, particularly the lip-syncing that looked much more realistic than the system we saw in Oblivion. - Team Xbox on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

The voice acting is decent in the game, but conversations are furthered by choosing a pre-determined text block and NPC comments are recycled from time to time. We did encounter some glitches in the audio department, and it can be comparable to the clipping that occurs from the visual standpoint. There were times when the game couldnt load up fast enough, making sound effects and dialogue either out of synch with the on-screen action or not playing at all. Again, it's not a big deal, but still noticeable. - Team Xbox on Oblivion (ref)

 

Where the faces in Oblivion sometimes looked a bit mushed and repetitive, those in Fallout 3 have much more lifelike detail. - IGN on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

Actually engaging NPCs in conversation is absolutely impressive - IGN on Oblivion (ref)

 

Now, environments looking fantastic in a Bethesda game arent exactly new: both Morrowind and Oblivion had fantastical environments, though the characters themselves looked a bit off; not so in Fallout 3. - RPGFan on Fallout 3 (ref)

 

Character models are well-drawn and animate with a surprising amount of grace and fluidity. Lips move in synch with speech. Eyes blink, facial expressions change, clothes move. All in all, the characters look strikingly real (save for the fact that most of them look like they have no teeth when they talka minor quibble) - RPGFan on Oblivion (ref)

 

Without quoting further, a strong impression is left that Oblivion, universally praised as a perfect reinvention of role-playing, has suddenly been demoted to nothing more than a springboard for Fallout 3.

 

And so...

 

What are we supposed to conclude from this? Nobody can look inside the heads of those reviewers, but why suddenly identify flaws in Oblivion now rather than a year ago, when it would still have mattered for opinion forming? Did they need a year to find these flaws? Do they not dare to criticize the game that early? Or can they only see flaws when they have something superior to compare it to?

 

And is this the future that awaits Fallout 3? When the TES V previews pop up, will they read "No more clunky character animations like in Fallout 3" or "No more childish aborted attempts at humor like in Fallout 3" or "This time, quest solutions really matter!" One thing is for sure, the gaming media is better at praising than they are at criticizing, since it takes them a one-hour demo to praise a game to high heavens, but a year to find flaws in a game once released.

 

Demoledor articulo en NMA sobre como los mismos medios que babeaban con Oblivion ahora encuentran errores y defectos al compararlo con la demo de Fallout 3

 

Un saludo


WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS

 

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHI

 

 

UNA REVOLUCION SIN BAILE NO ES UNA REVOLUCION QUE MEREZCA LA PENA

 

EMMA GOLDMAN

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Monseñor PARIETINAE UMBRA

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Sí, siempre igual. Siempre que analizan un juego nuevo, tienen que destrozar el anterior. Pero no va de eso el artículo, sino de lo que siempre pienso respecto de las revistas y los analistas.

Explico por doquier que en su día, presencié una paloma en el cielo; y tras ella el cielo se descorrió, permitiendo en su esplendor, mis pupilas se prendieran. Bendito sea Dios, María Santísima.

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varga Saitama

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IGN

FALLOUT 3 MEJOR JUEGO DE TODO EL E3

http://games.ign.com...6/806770p9.html



Entrevista Peter Hines en SPONG

http://spong.com/det...=&page=1&cb=935

Fallout 3 was the game of E3 2007. Pretty much everyone who saw the brain-meltingly awesome demo at this years show is in agreement on this.

Fans of the original Fallout games and fans of role-playing games really have no choice in this they are going to have to spend the next fifteen months soaking up every last morsel on Fallout 3 while they patiently wait to play it when it gets released in late 2008. Lets also not forget the legions of casual (or lapsed) role-playing fans out there many of whom Bethesda has managed to rope back in with the mighty Oblivion in recent years.

Hell, once you have seen Fallout 3 you will soon realise that this is not even a genre game. The storyline, the characters, the graphics, the combat system, the mind-blowing attention to the smallest details all scream it. I walked out of the E3 demo of Fallout 3 shortly after conducting the interview below, and I had a sh*t-eating grin on my face the likes of which I seriously cannot remember since I first saw Half Life 2 some years back.

Thats what I think, but what does Peter Hines (pictured), vice president of public relations and marketing for Bethesda, think?

SPOnG: Before we talk more about Fallout 3, what are your general impressions of the new E3 format?

Pete Hines: Well, I actually love it! This is my favourite E3, ever. But then I have the benefit of not actually having to leave this lovely hotel I actually get to sleep in the same building that my booth is in, so it's much easier and much more convenient. I definitely appreciate the tighter focus on press stuff and not being so crazed with all those other folks we used to have to deal with. It just fits better with what it is we like to do, which is nice presentations of the big stuff we have going on. The press response seems to be mixed I mean, obviously having to jump from hotel to hotel is pretty inconvenient, but some people seem miss that loud, chaotic insanity from past years!

SPOnG: For those that dont really know about the history of Fallout can you give us a quick potted history?

Pete Hines: The original Fallout was released in 1997, developed by Black Isle Studios for Interplay. The team changed a little, some of the principals from that team left, and Fallout 2 was made by a slightly different team. F2 was put out in 1998 and then, after that, there were a couple of what you might call derivative games: there was a Brotherhood of Steel game that was kind of like a hacknslash it was supposed to be kind of like Baldurs Gate: Dark Alliance but in the Fallout universe. There was a Fallout Tactics game, which captured the turn-based strategy part but theres been no true Fallout game, no true role-playing game in the Fallout series since 1998. So, its been sitting around for a long time with nothing happening.

A lot of us here were are - big fans of Fallout, and we finally said, Well if nobody else is going to do another one, why dont we do it?. So, we went out and acquired the rights to do it and weve been working on it since 2004, in some way, shape or form and now were finally at a point where we can start showing you guys where were up to.

SPOnG: Do you have any of the guys from the original Fallout or Fallout 2 teams involved?

Pete Hines: No, it's our team. Mainly the Oblivion team.

SPOnG: Whats the whole deal with rabid Fallout fanboys desperately worried that Fallout 3 is not going to be a proper RPG?

Pete Hines: Well, at its core Fallout 3 is definitely a role-playing game. If you are of the opinion that any Fallout RPG has to be exactly like the games that came out in 1997 and 1998 down to every feature and detail, thats definitely not the game we are making. We are trying to make a true successor in the Fallout franchise, something that is a true role-playing game that immerses you in this world, and hopefully brings out the best of what that series is about which is great tone and setting and themes and characters and player choice You know, its a really interesting, special role-playing system.

If folks are interested in a new Fallout game (as opposed to being slavishly interested in a specific list of demands relating to Fallout or Fallout2); or [they] are just interested in role-playing in general but may not have played the original games; or they are just looking for the next big RPG or the next big RPG coming from Bethesda we certainly hope all of those folks are interested in what we are up to with Fallout 3.

Nobody enters, nobody leaves
SPOnG: I suppose the mere fact that there are still ardent Fallout fans out there speaks volumes for the enduring quality of the first games.

Pete Hines: Yeah, not just the quality, but how different the original games were for their time, you know? They really broke the mould of all of the classical fantasy stuff being done around that time.

Bethesda had just put out Daggerfall around that time (1996) for example. Fallout really cut against the fantasy grain and did some pretty unique things: with full facial animations, lip-syncing and that kind of thing. It definitely resonated and has stuck with folks both rabid and non-rabid; both those who have talked about it every day of their lives since it first came out, and those who just really liked it and cant wait to play another one.

SPOnG: Have you considered bundling versions of those earlier Fallout games with Fallout 3?

Pete Hines: No. They are still out there. Interplay still has the ability to sell and distribute those. They are also based on a completely different generation of hardware and operating systems. It can be difficult to get that stuff to run. Were basically moving forward with where we want to take it and not re-treading stuff that came out nearly ten years ago.

SPOnG: Okay, the storyline really is key in Fallout 3. When is it set? Can you give us an overview?

Pete Hines: The bombs fell in 2077, so its set 200 years after the bombs fell. Basically it is the story of your character who is born in the Vault. You spend the first part of the game, your entire life to that point, in the Vault. So, you flash through different periods of your early life, and at every step of the way your father, who is played by Liam Neeson, is there. So, you see yourself as a baby, you see yourself at ten years old, and so forth. You are creating a character, as well as learning a bit about the game and doing some quests and stuff.

Then one day you wake up and its your nineteenth birthday and your father is gone. Nobody in over two hundred years has ever entered or left the Vault so this is a shocking thing not only to you but to everybody in the Vault.

The overseer who is in charge of the Vault is obviously very upset that somebody has broken the cardinal rule, Nobody enters, nobody leaves, and also he thinks you have something to do with your fathers disappearance - of course, you dont.

You have no idea why he left. You expected him to be there and hes not. So this is kind of the jumping off point. The overseers thugs are out to get you and you basically figure out a way to break out of the Vault like your father did to go in search of him.

What was so important? Why did he leave me behind? What did he need to go and do? Where is he? These are the questions you ask yourself and these are your reasons for leaving the Vault and venturing out into this post-nuclear wasteland.

SPOnG: Any other well-known guys doing voice-overs in addition to Liam Neeson?

Pete Hines: Yep, Ron Perlman (Hellboy) is the narrator he was the narrator in the first two games. Those are really the only two guys were talking about right now.

There are also other iconic things from the series in Fallout 3 from the first two games such as The Ink Spots, who were this great band from the 1940s and 50s era who did the theme-song for the original games . We licensed one of their most popular tracks the one that the original developers wanted to use in the original Fallout but couldnt get the rights to. So thats the I Dont Want To Set The World On Fire tune, from the teaser trailer, and also from where the game starts.

So, its little things like this. Were big fans of the series and what it did and what it was about and we want to stay as true as possible to everything sound effects, voiceover, music, whatever it is.

SPOnG: Why use 1940s and 50s style music?

Pete Hines: So the set-up for Fallout is that basically the world as we know it splits off from our current timeline after World War II and diverges on a different timeline and the future that they go on is basically that whole kind of Leave It To Beaver '50s idea of tomorrow-land so what they thought the future was going to be like back then, with robot-maids and rocket-cars and jetpacks and laser rifles and so on [doesn't go away]. So that 40s and 50s stuff doesnt go away.

It just continues on through their history. Until the bombs fall in 2077. So it's really just a tomorrow-land version of the 50s thats all blown to hell!

And then when you come back into this destroyed world you still have people trying to preserve their 1950s hairstyles and listening to the same music and whatnot thats the shtick of it its not the timeline that we are on now that gets blown up, its all about this completely separate alternate universe where it's all about nuclear powered this and fusion-generators and stuff.

Liam Neeson is the impetus for the majority of the main quest

NadiaSPOnG: What was it like working with Neeson?

Pete Hines: Oh, hes brilliant. Hes such a good mimic! You see him get into this character, you put the script in front of him and it really is just like all of a sudden he becomes this completely different person. Hes talking to you like youre an infant, then hes talking to you like youre sixteen. His ability to change in a moment [clicks fingers] hes such a good actor.

He also brings a great presence to this very important role of the players father in the game. Patrick Stewart, we used in Oblivion, but we always said that the whole story of Oblivion is that the emperor is killed and you have to find his son so we kinda told you He s going to die really early and you need to find his heir. Whereas in this game Liam Neeson is the impetus for the majority of the main quest its about finding your father, finding out what he is up to, finding out if you can help him.

SPOnG: There is a lot of talk about how next-gen formats allow for more emotional depth in videogames, but a lot of people seem to perhaps overlook the importance of storyline and character would that be a fair point?

Pete Hines: I certainly think that storytelling in general is one of the areas where our industry has the most room for improvement. It is certainly something that we are keenly aware of in Fallout and something we are trying to spend more time on. When you do a game as big as Oblivion with literally thousands of characters it is really tough to make every single one of those memorable and special and give them a lot of depth. Whereas, in Fallout, its a much smaller scope.

Were talking about hundreds of NPCs rather than thousands. So we can spend a lot more time crafting those characters, their personalities and their dialogue and we really hope that folks will get excited about what weve done in this area.

SPOnG: How many guys do you have working on the writing side of things?

Pete Hines: Probably about the same size team we had working on Oblivion. We have a group of designers who are focused entirely on quests and dialogue. Then we have a group of designers who are focused on levels and for lack of a better word dungeons and that sort of thing.

SPOnG: One of the features in Fallout 3 that really stands out is V.A.T.S. (Vault-tec Assisted Targeting System) can you explain how this works?

Pete Hines: V.A.T.S. was really born out of a desire to make the game work best as a first-person game remember that the original games were third-person with turn-based combat. We feel that first-person is the most immersive way to put a player in a world. However, at the same time we wanted something that stayed as true as possible to role-playing. We dont want something that rewards the quick-twitch FPS player. Were not trying to reward players who are good at Call of Duty or Halo or whatever.

We want the skills and abilities of your character to determine success or failure. So, one of the things weve included is this V.A.T.S. mode allows you to stop time and queue up moves for your character to implement, in almost a compressed time mode. And then we play it out in a cinematic fashion.

So, at any point in the game you can pause it and spend action points to target any particular point on a creature or creatures that you might be fighting. So, you might aim to shoot one guy in the leg to aim to slow him down as he runs to attack you with his melee weapon, while at the same time aiming to shoot this other guy in the arm so that hes less accurate with his weapon, while you might aim to shoot a third guy in the head for a quick kill and then you press a button and the game acts out all that stuff for you in a cinematic mode. Over time your action points are recharged. You get to make moves based on how many action points it takes to fire a certain weapon, or whatever the case may be.

So, its really a way of giving you a chance to pause the action, take stock of situations and make smart choices about who you are going to target. You know, a lot of shooters you play, theres ammo all over the place. Whereas in this game, youre in a post-nuclear wasteland. You cant just go down to the local ammo shop and buy as much as you want. You have to scrounge for what you need to survive. You have to conserve ammo and resolve the battles as smartly as possible. A combination of the skills of your player and the conditions of your weapons determines how likely you are to hit the particular body parts of your enemies.

Giant ants and rat scorpions

CyrusSPOnG: What kind of weapons do you get? What types of baddies will you come across?

Pete Hines: You start of with nothing when you leave the Vault, but you scrounge around and find hunting rifles and Chinese assault rifles and laser rifles theres a whole range of different types of weapons, small and big, energy weapons, that kind of thing.

As for the baddies, there are a lot of creatures that are drawn from the original games. Then there are a number of new ones. Your biggest foes in the game are these super-mutants that are invading the world and are in a constant battle to push humans out. Youll find all kinds of weird mutated creatures in the game from giant ants through to rat scorpions. You have to ask yourself What has radiation done to all these creatures that were in this world before the bomb fell? So you can imagine the kinds of strange mutants youll encounter.

SPOnG: Talking about killing and violence, what do you think of the whole Manhunt 2 debate at the minute? Are you concerned by this whole increased media and politial focus on the effects of very violent videogames?

Pete Hines: Well, for us, it is all a matter of context. Our game is not a game where all you do is violently kill human beings one after the other. That might be part of the game or it might not be. You know, you might choose to role-play a particular type of character who, as much as possible, chooses to avoid conflict and avoid combat.

You might want to use your speech skill, for example, to try to resolve potential conflicts peacefully wherever possible. So, we are not a you are going to kill lots of things very violently game.

If you choose to play the game violently, then so be it, but it is in the context of this much larger role-playing game where you are talking to people and solving problems and buying and trading things.

The same thing could be said for Oblivion. You could do nothing but run around and fight things with swords if you wanted to. But thats not the entire game theres loads of other stuff to do, NPCs to talk to, potions to make, flowers to pick, lots of other stuff! Its very important that violence within our games is seen in the context of the overall game.

In the case of Manhunt 2 the context was and Ive not played the game, but based on what the ratings boards have said its just that non-stop killing one after the other after the other. At least thats my impression of it. Thats not the case for us.

SPOnG: Sure, its a totally different type of game. However, in Fallout 3 you have said that the moral behaviour of your character is very important.

Pete Hines: Yeah, its huge. In Fallout one of the big things is that the number of quests you have is much smaller than in Oblivion, but all of those quests have a much greater number of ways in which they might be solved. So, in Oblivion, if you were playing a certain type of character say if you were an evil guy, you would lean towards the Dark Brotherhood quests.

Whereas in Fallout it is more like you are presented with these various quests and you choose how you want to resolve them: are you going to be a nice guy? A mean guy? Or are you going to be in that grey area in-between, where you are not entirely sure if you feel good about your actions? You are presented with these moral dilemmas and you, the player, will make these decisions on a quest-by-quest basis.

SPOnG: There has been a lot of speculation about this Corpses Eaten statistic that we can see in the game from the current demo you are showing does this mean that you can play as a zombie in the game?

Pete Hines: Were not talking about Corpses Eaten right now [smiles]. There is an awful lot of stuff that we still have to tell folks about Fallout 3. Dont forget that we are not coming out till Fall 2008 we have a long way to go still!

SPOnG: Great stuff. Thanks for your time Pete!

Pete Hines: No worries. Now let me show you this new demo. Youll like this.



F.A.Q. respondiendo a cuestiones sobre la demo de FALLOUT 3

http://www.bethsoft....howtopic=732271

Un avance

The behemoth creature - how huge and did he 'break' that house as he came into view or was that coincidence?
I was furiously typing and didn't see if he busted the building. Given some of the new tech in the engine though, I wouldn't doubt it. If I recall correctly I'd estimate he was 30+ feet tall.

We know that we can tune in to old songs with the PIPboy, but how was the soundtrack outside of that? Was it ambient electronic like the older games, or perhaps orchestral?
We only heard a few songs. If I recall correctly, there was an orchestral track when we went into town, but I'm not 100% sure. The combat music was upbeat but not electronic. I talked about the licensed tracks above.

Was the encounter with the brotherhood soldiers realistic? How did the soldiers move and act etc?
They took cover, displaced, and popped over the walls to fire at the enemies. It was likely scripted, but it looked good. Certainly better than the "Rush forward and be slain!" AI moments in Oblivion.

Do you know if there is any Oblivion style "quest compass" in place?
Ooooh...Good question! I'll have to follow up. I seem to recall their being a HUD of sorts in the bottom right that had several arrows on a compass. I'll have to consult my hastily scribbled notes and/or ask the developers for the answer on that one.


ENTREVISTA a BRYAN FARGO SOBRE FALLOUT 3 y WASTELAND 2(ojalá saque pasta como sea para hacerlo)

GFW: While not many games are straight-up comedy, some do have it in degrees. Take your work on Fallout [Brian Fargo did not do any work on Fallout - NMA] --it bridged that gap, but in a very dark way.
BF: Oh, yeah--we love the dark humor. [Laughs] And the older we get, the darker we get. When you mix the absurd with the hyperviolent--like what Tarantino does in films--you can get some great results.

GFW: Bethesda [the developer making Fallout 3] hasn't really done dark humor in their games. Do you think this will matter?
BF: Yeah, their stuff is a little more serious, a little drier. Humor is tough to do, but you know what? They're clever guys, and I can't wait to see what they do. I know that they'll do well. In fact, I'd trust maybe three developers with Fallout---and Bethesda's definitely [one of them]. One thing I can tell you, though, is that our Wasteland would be much darker than their Fallout.

GFW: That's right--you've aquired the rights to Wasteland.
BF: It started it all. If the right design idea comes along, we would love to make another Wasteland game. I think Bethesda is gonna do gangbusters with Fallout--just great--and if they make a huge hit, maybe people will be curious to get another look at what inspired Fallout in the first place.

GFW: Why didn't you just make a Wasteland sequel back then? Did it not sell well?
BF: It was strange. You see, EA released Wasteland on the exact same day as The Bard's Tale II: The Destiny Knight. They were trying to meet financials for their quarter end. We were like the Bioware of that time, known for our RPGs. Imagine if Bioware released two games on the same day. That'd never happen--it makes no sense. So, end of story, the game did well, but it fell under many people's radar because of when it released. We actually did try to get the rights Wasteland to make a sequel, but EA considered us competitors at that point. We had to create Fallout as a result.

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Anoik Genos

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En GamingTrend.com han recogido las respuestas que su director, Ron Burke, ha dado a algunas de las preguntas que le han formulado en el foro oficial del juego. Hay cuatro partes, y en total son un buen puñado de preguntas, aunque muchas son tan tontas como las que se hacían en su día para el Oblivion :roll:

La parte 1 está aquí.
La parte 2 está aquí.
La parte 3 está aquí.
La parte 4 está aquí.

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Dr_Subzero Investigation Team

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Yo de momento no he podido aguantar. Para hacer la espera más agradable me he comprado el 'Fallout Collection', un DVD que incluye Fallout, Fallout 2 y Fallout Tactics. Todo por 13 eurillos.

si alguien se siente interesado en jugar o rejugar esta saga recomiendo esta compra. ;)

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uRaCiLo Gran Lobo Sif

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A veces desearía no tener tanta información gracias a internet... o sencillamente que los juegos no se anunciasen con tanta antelación pues me parece una auténtica tortura y una espera infernal que nos pongan desde YA los dientes largos con un juego del que falta aún AÑO Y MEDIO para su salida... :-(

Es que es una burrada. J0der, en año y medio se puede morir uno y todo antes de que salga. :roll:

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Anoik Genos

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Bueno Uracilo, el morirse antes tiene sus ventajas, como por ejemplo no tener que estar esperando más de un año por el juego :lol:

Por cierto, el juego ya tiene página propia, y no el teaser que había hasta ahora. Está en http://fallout.bethsoft.com/index.html

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Fodel Gran Lobo Sif

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Entevista a Emil Pagliarulo, diseñador jefe de Fallout 3

 

Enlace

 

Lo mas destacable es que nos aclara que era Fallout :D

 

Fallout wasn't a turn-based strategy game... it wasn't a turn-based RPG for that matter. It was real-time RPG with turn-based combat.

Aclara que es Fallout para Bethesda

 

It has everything to do with the way you approach the setting, the characters, the ironic humor, that sort of thing.

 

Y nos avisa

 

As for a perceived swing toward action, I honestly don't think the platform has anything to do with it. Bethesda's games - even going as far back as Arena on the PC - have always had a strong action component. Oblivion is a pretty fast-paced game, by traditional RPG standards. I mean, that's one of the things that sets Bethesda's games apart all others. And there's a reason for that - those are the games we like to play. So, you know, it's only natural those are the games we prefer to make. And our previous successes have shown us that we're not alone - there are multitudes of gamers out there who enjoy more action-oriented RPGs.

 

El resto es el habitual hype (VATS sera la releche, RAdiant IA la repera, y Fallout 3 la reostia).

 

Un saludo


WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS

 

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHI

 

 

UNA REVOLUCION SIN BAILE NO ES UNA REVOLUCION QUE MEREZCA LA PENA

 

EMMA GOLDMAN

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Guest

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Guest
Estos de Bethesda estan muy creciditos, con esa actitud asquerósamente prepotente (somos los mas guachichulis por que tenemos hordas de fanboys que nos apoyan y los demas son estupidos). Y Fallout 3 podrá ser todo lo buen juego que quieran, pero no le va a llegar ni a la suela de los zapatos a los dos Fallout ( ni a Arcanum).

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Constantine GRANDIS SUPERNUS

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Y Fallout 3 podrá ser todo lo buen juego que quieran, pero no le va a llegar ni a la suela de los zapatos a los dos Fallout ( ni a Arcanum).

Seguramente nó le llegara, pero... ¿Por qué no esperamos a que salga el juego para comprobarlo?

Ya habrá tiempo de ponerse en plán criticón-pedante, no te preocupes..

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Santiago KRATOS

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Y Fallout 3 podrá ser todo lo buen juego que quieran, pero no le va a llegar ni a la suela de los zapatos a los dos Fallout ( ni a Arcanum).

Seguramente nó le llegara, pero... ¿Por qué no esperamos a que salga el juego para comprobarlo?

Ya habrá tiempo de ponerse en plán criticón-pedante, no te preocupes..

Estoy deacuerdo, pero ya que sale tanto "hypermegahype" un año y medi oantes de que salga, al menos podremos hacer comentarios sobre las cosas que nos intentan vender ¿no?. Cuando salga el juego podremos decir si es bueno o malo, y mientras tanto podremos decir si creemos que será bueno o malo. ¿No te parece?


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