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[Post Oficial] Red Steel - Actualizado 19-11-06

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Publicado
vida restante: 100%
Imagen Enviada

Lanzamiento:
Lanzamiento simultaneo con Wii


Desarrollador:
Ubisoft


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Calificacion PEGI:
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www.pegi.info

Media

Vive una experiencia radicalmente diferente en los juegos de acción en primera persona. El primer FPS que explotará al máximo la tecnología de Nintendo Wii en dos estilos de lucha, el más moderno con armas de fuego y el más ancestral con Katana..


Una batalla entre lo moderno y lo tradicional.

El jugador encarnará el papel de un joven cuya prometida ha sido sorprendentemente secuestrada en Los Angeles.

Con el objetivo de rescatarla tendrá que viajar a Japón y sumergirse en una guerra entre clanes Yakuza. Para lograr el éxito en su misión necesitará convertirse un verdadero experto en la lucha con armas de fuego y espada.

Red Steel sumergirá al jugador en la acción como jamás si ha visto hasta el momento en un videojuego ya que se experimentará una auténtica inmersión física.

Aprovechando al máximo los recursos tecnológicos que ofrece el mando y la tecnología de Wii podremos:

Apunta y dispara como jamás se pensó que podría hacerse:

Toda la pantalla es susceptible de ser apuntada y disparada directamente con el puntero del mando.
Podrás hacer girar el mando con tu mano y girará el arma completamente.
Modo Congelación. Si se captura el objetivo varios segundo sobre el enemigo, entra el modo congelación donde se puede apuntar a varios enemigos y elegir entre matar o neutralizar, desarmándolo.



Empuña el mando como una verdadera espada:

Mix sorprendente de movimientos físicos y punteo con el mando, para desplegar diferentes ataques de espada.
Un buen control de la katana permitirá desarmar enemigos sin matarlos, incluso convertirles en aliados que te hara experimentar por primera vez el verdadero poder del honor.



Desafía con la espada a tus amigos en un Modo Multijugador que te creará adicción.

No te lo pierdas:

-Anuncio de la primera entrevista para España del director Creativo de Red Steel
http://www.meristati...a3c3d62&pic=NRV

-Y porque una imagen vale más que mil palabras:
http://www.gameprotv...video-2054.html


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Wii

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ÍNDICE
1-Últimas Noticias
2-Reviews
3-Previews
4-Clanes
5-Imágenes
6-Videos
7-Compra On-Line

2-Reviews

Gamespot.com

Score: 5.5 Gameplay 5 Graphics 6 Sound 7 Value 6 Tilt 5

Red Steel introduces a promising control scheme both for shooting thugs and for slashing them with samurai swords, but wraps it in a buggy, thoroughly unimpressive game.

The Good: Interesting take on first-person shooter controls; nice explosions and destructible environments.
The Bad: Clunky sword-fighting sequences slapped into the middle of all the shooting; inane story chock-full of painful dialogue and voice acting; numerous noticeable bugs and glitches.

Red Steel is like a typical PG-13-rated, straight-to-DVD action movie: It can be fun for a while, but it's probably going to leave a bad taste in your mouth. The analogy runs deeper than that. In the game, which is rife with bad dialogue and generic shoot-outs, you're an American bodyguard who must learn the way of the samurai so that he can defeat the Japanese gangsters who've kidnapped his girlfriend. Of course, you'll be spending much more time gunning down yakuza thugs than engaging in any swordplay, and unfortunately, neither aspect of the game is particularly good. Nor is the game's presentation, which looks dated and downright ugly in spots. Red Steel basically proves that the Wii Remote, in spite of its unconventional design, can do at least an adequate job of letting you control a first-person action game. And to some extent, the controls do feel novel, enough to help make a mediocre shooter seem at least somewhat special.

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Red Steel's theme and unusual controls might be compelling, but the action and presentation stumble and fall flat.

The story is shallow and sometimes goes as far as to get in the way of the action, such as when you're stuck replaying a tough action sequence with a tedious, unskippable cutscene in it. You play as a guy named Scott, though he doesn't speak and is given no personality since you view the game entirely from a first-person viewpoint. He's about to meet the father of his pretty Japanese fiancée when all hell breaks loose and a bunch of dudes start shooting up the place. It tuns out that Dad's a high-ranking yakuza boss and he's got enemies. Anyway, the girl is captured, so you go after her. Along the way, you pick up a sword. Eventually you find yourself in Japan, getting in good with a rival family and doing jobs for its lieutenants so that they help you out. You keep on shooting lots of goons with guns, sometimes stopping for a sword fight.

There's no reason to care much about Scott, his girl, his yakuza friends, or the bad guys. Some of the dialogue is just rotten, while some of it is unintentionally funny. Many of the characters you'll meet speak with thick Japanese accents, but apart from that, Red Steel doesn't come across as authentic in any way. There's nothing exotic about running and gunning through factories and high-rises. There's one crazy level in a deranged amusement park, which, while not terribly original in itself, is probably the one noteworthy departure from the predictable, linear environments you'll be trudging through. In between missions, you'll sometimes get graphic-novel-style cutscenes, reminiscent of Max Payne or Sin City, except they look like storyboards rather than completed images. The entire game carries the half-baked look and feel of these cutscenes.

At best, Red Steel's controls are novel, and they have the potential to be a good fit for a better game. You use the Wii Remote to aim the gun you have equipped, though you might be put off by how your own wrist movements are awkwardly emulated by the onscreen hand-holding-a-gun. Pressing and holding the A button brings your weapon up to eye level, slowing your turning speed so you can more easily draw a bead on a bad guy. There's a rather generous auto-aim window to help you shoot people down. One of the stranger aspects of the shooting is how you can zoom in for a closer look at your foes by moving the Wii Remote toward the screen. When using a sniper rifle, this doesn't seem like an intuitive way of adjusting the scope to a higher magnification, but it works.

Meanwhile, you'll be holding the Nunchuk attachment in your off hand, and a quick swing of it makes you reload your gun, open doors, and so on. You can even tip over some tables to make cover, though this isn't necessary. Of course, the Nunchuk's analog stick is used to make you run in different directions, while the Remote controls your turning as well as your aiming. As you shoot, the sounds of your weapon reloading and a few other effects come crunching through the Wii Remote's tinny little speaker, which can be distracting, though you can turn the volume down if you want. You can carry only two guns at a time, but during the course of the game you'll get to wield a nice-enough, predictable variety of pistols, automatics, and shotguns. Overall, the shooting controls definitely take getting used to and don't wind up feeling particularly immersive, let alone superior to the conventional first-person shooter controls found on other consoles or the PC. But at least they're different and, while this admittedly is not much of a compliment, functional.

Imagen Enviada
Controlling the action takes some getting used to, but soon enough you'll be blasting lowlifes like nobody's business.

You'll be shooting lots of near-brain-dead thugs throughout the game, who sometimes use cover pretty well but at other times will run right past you for no reason. They can be reasonably fun to shoot sometimes, especially since the game does a pretty good job of having destructible environments that get all torn up by errant gunfire. At other times, though, you'll be getting sniped by foes you can barely even see, which can be maddening. However, ducking behind cover to avoid taking any more damage for a couple of seconds causes all of your health to quickly regenerate, which, along with the lackluster artificial intelligence, makes most shoot-outs a breeze. There's one other twist to the gunplay--your focus mode, which is an ability you gain that lets you stop time altogether so you can carefully line up some cheap shots. Using this ability, you can shoot the guns right out of the bad guys' hands, then force them to surrender by waving the Wii Remote around. Later on in the game, this becomes the easiest way to defeat groups of enemies quickly. It's nonsensical but it at least affords a change of pace from the rinse-and-repeat nature of most of the shooting.

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3-Previews

Meristation.com
Red Steel: Preview en MeriStation ------------------------- Nacho Ortiz
Red Steel va a ser el primer shooter que Wii va a recibir. El nuevo concepto jugable ha hecho recaer sobre él muchas miradas y también unas altas expectativas. Tanto que en el E3 recibió críticas sobre su nivel visual y ciertos aspectos del control. Antes del lanzamiento Ubisoft nos acercó hasta París para que pudiéramos ver la progresión del título tras los últimos meses de duro trabajo.

Gráficamente Red Steel tiene ahora un aspecto mucho más completo. Comparando con lo que vimos en el E3 apreciamos que se ha ganado en detalle; más efectos de iluminación y sombreados, reflejos en tiempo real, juego de partículas más poblado -especialmente apreciable en los tiroteos-, texturas más trabajadas, suavidad en las animaciones y ausencia de ralentizaciones. Aunque suene a tópico, nos encontramos con un acabado mucho más acorde y exigible a la nueva generación que lo mostrado en Los Angeles, que según sus desarrolladores, fue algo que no se presentó en las mejores condiciones por la necesidad imperiosa de enseñar el título por primera vez.

Siguiendo con lo visual, la documentación ha tenido un papel fundamental en la recreación del juego de luces. Los desarrolladores, en su visita a Japón, tuvieron claro que debían capturar tal cual la particular iluminación japonesa; neones, destellos, colores y transiciones entre luces y sombras. Esto técnicamente se consiguió cargando muchas texturas en pantalla para transmitir solidez, iluminar los detalles a destacar con colores más vivos y con un fuerte juego de claroscuros para acentuar los contrastes.

Así mismo, se juega también con los materiales que forman los escenarios y con su arquitectura, insertando simétrias en las sorprendentes construcciones. Se cuenta con un alto grado de minuciosidad en los fondos, recreados de forma dinámica, algo que permite que el número de elementos interactivos aumente; cada uno de ellos es potencialmente destructible. El estudio confiesa que ha sido difícil debido a que se debe mantener un equilibrio entre detalle e iluminación y memoria.

Pero al margen de lo técnico, el diseño de Red Steel es una delicia. Bebiendo de influencias como Tokyo Underground o Black Rain, la representación del choque entre oriente y occidente ha terminado por mostrar una estética increíblemente atractiva. "Intentamos recrear la cautivadora sensación que recorre a cualquier occidental cuando por primera vez entra en contacto con Japón". Además del choque entre culturas, los creativos han mezclado modernidad y tradición en un exquisito contraste que se une al trasfondo principal del título; la lucha entre yakuzas.

El interesante argumento empieza a desvelarse cuando descubres que han secuestrado a tu novia y que su padre, líder de la mafia japonesa, ha muerto asesinado a manos de una banda rival. El único modo de salvar a la persona que amas y defender tu honor es viajar desde los Ángeles hasta Japón y enfrentarte a los bajos fondos de Tokio. Gracias al aprendizaje del antiguo arte de la lucha japonesa con la katana y a la precisión de las armas de fuego modernas, progresarás y lograrás adaptarte a este ambiente extranjero en el que la habilidad no siempre garantiza la victoria.

IGN.com
Red Steel: Impressions and Video
Should you add Ubisoft's ambitious Wii FPS to your must-buy list? Read about our play test and watch stunning direct-feed movies.
by Matt Casamassina

October 13, 2006 - There are a lot of Wii games designed for a new type of gamer -- that elusive hold-out who has steered clear of your traditional genres. Wii Sports is perhaps the best example of the pick-up-and-play experiences the Big N's new console nurtures, and Ubisoft's Rayman Raving Rabbids -- a title packed with easily accessible mini challenges -- is another. But neither Nintendo nor its third parties have altogether abandoned or even forgotten about the tried-and-true games that have, at least up until now, helped define a robust and growing industry. Nintendo will launch The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, which has been heralded by the company as the greatest entry into the franchise yet, with Wii. And only less anticipated than Link's latest is Red Steel, a new first-person shooter developed from the ground-up by Ubisoft to capitalize on Nintendo's unique controller.

Zelda and Red Steel appeal primarily to what Nintendo calls the core gamer, or the type of player who has been at this for awhile, knows the ins and outs of traditional titles, and is always the early adopter. You, in other words. But these games have not gone unscathed by controversy. A new Wii-centric control scheme has some hardcore players up in arms over Zelda. And despite a very intriguing theme and one of the prettiest presentations on Iwata and company's new console, Red Steel has been criticized for its sometimes-unintuitive control. In fact, we receive regular e-mails from readers asking us -- or rather, pleading with us to tell them that Red Steel plays as good as it looks. So does it? We recently spent several undisturbed hours with the game to find out. And if you're the impatient type, we've posted 10 new direct-feed movies of the title in motion so you can skip our words and see for yourself.

After we played the first-person shooter at Nintendo's New York City event in September, we have to be honest: we were worried. At the time, Red Steel simply didn't control well. We questioned whether or not this was true because the game was mechanically unresponsive or because the experience was being lessened by controller interference; Nintendo's event was, after all, overflowing with kiosks, all of which were using wireless Wii remotes, and hence interference was bound to be an issue. As it turns out, the latest build of Ubisoft's shooter plays much better than the game did in New York -- to the point, in fact, where many of our former concerns have been cast aside. And yet, the control is still not as sensitive or as responsive as we would like. Strangely enough, however, Red Steel is somehow still fun -- still engaging and enjoyable -- despite its shortcomings. Keep reading as we go into detail.

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We're not going to waste much time on the game's back-story because you've undoubtedly read about it multiple times over by now. In short, your fiancee has been kidnapped by the Yakuza and you must travel to modern-day Japan to rescue her. Along the way, you'll meet up with interesting, authentic-sounding Japanese sword fighters, gain access to the legendary sword known as the Katana Giri, and eventually duel with it. You'll also equip a strong selection of guns, from simple shooters to automatics and sniper rifles, as you battle your way through picturesque Japanese dojos and into neon-filled nightclubs. Red Steel is different from any other first-person shooter because it not only enables you to use the Wii-mote to accurately aim, but also to fight with your sword. And after some real play time, there's little doubt that the game regularly challenges you to master both.

Ubisoft has chosen to tell the story in a very stylized manner that pays homage to anime. Rather than running pre-rendered footage or progressing the tale using the game-engine, the story unfolds via overlapping cels. There's very little animation involved. For instance, in one sequence, an airplane flies over a static background of Japan, which is meant to illustrate the hero's arrival in the region. Readers who bought Electronic Arts' Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban for consoles will recognize a similar pop-up style presentation. It's not overly flashy, but it does deliver your motivation and simultaneously sets the mood. You can download a video snippet showing it all off in our media section.

Let's just get to it. Red Steel's bounding box -- the invisible field that separates reticule targeting from turning left and right or up and down -- is large and forgiving. It is designed to be big so that you will be able to aim at most of the screen's real estate without accidentally causing your character to turn in any direction. In fact, you turn only when your reticule strays to one edge of the screen. By contrast, both Call of Duty 3 and Metroid Prime 3 use small bounding boxes, which means that you'll begin turning almost as soon as the reticule strays from the center of the screen. What's better? That really depends on you. People who value the ability to turn on a dime in FPSs will find similar movement in Red Steel slow. Even most dual-analog setups have Ubisoft's title beat in turning speed. There is a big advantage to this control scheme, though, which is that using your Wii-mote you can target with pinpoint accuracy the majority of the screen -- and you can do it quickly. That's the trade off.

Metroid Prime 3 and Call of Duty 3 have an immediate advantage, which is that the smaller bounding box is in some ways familiar to the fixed reticule setup in PC-based FPSs. Red Steel's control method is altogether new. If you want to turn, you have to literally aim your weapon at the edge of the screen to make it happen. Frankly, there's a learning curve to it, which might explain some of the negative control backlash the game has received. When you've got the action centered, the game control is completely and totally intuitive because you can target with a greater degree of precision using the Wii-mote than has ever been possible with a dual-analog setup. You simply point and shoot -- it feels natural and good. You eventually get used to this admittedly oddball control method and as you get better the game experience grows on you. You learn the intricacies of movement and it eventually becomes instinctual. And it's at exactly this point where you stop worrying about bounding boxes and just play. If you can get to that point, you will like Red Steel.

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Hands-on Red Steel
A brand new set of levels and some new gameplay mechanics. Full impressions.
by Matt Casamassina

September 14, 2006 - When it comes to console launches, publisher Ubisoft doesn't play around. As the majority of Nintendo fans no doubt already know, the company has eight games planned to debut during the "launch window" of Wii - or in other words, sometime between mid-November and the end of the year. One of the company's most ambitious titles is a ground-up first-person shooter called Red Steel. The title, set in modern-day Japan, has been designed exclusively for Wii.

Ubisoft has proven to be very protective of the shooter - perhaps rightfully so. When the company unveiled Red Steel in playable form at the Electronics Entertainment Expo 2006, not everybody was overjoyed with the game's control scheme, which functioned, but seemed to lack precision, particularly where turning was concerned. Since that time, Ubi has steered clear of showing any new gameplay levels, choosing instead to release screenshots depicting only one stage - the same one demoed last May.

So you can imagine how pleasantly surprised we were when reps for the publisher told us that not only would Red Steel be playable at Nintendo's New York-based Wii event, but also that the newest demo would feature two never-before-seen levels. The publisher even gave us a first glimpse of those levels in an officially released trailer, which can be found in our video section now.

So how has Red Steel progressed since we last saw and played it? That's not an easy question to answer due to a number of circumstances. Although the game is very likely farther along than almost any other third party effort, Ubisoft recently encountered some technical issues that resulted in a sometimes-buggy gameplay experience on the show floor. Demo crashes and glitches are typical for unfinished products - and indeed several of the games at Nintendo's event, including Excite Truck - would lock up.

However, there were also control issues that may or may not be related to the quality of the build. Very often, we found ourselves moving through the game's stylized and interactive environments with ease, but occasionally our reticule would disappear from the screen entirely and try as we may to turn left or right, our character would not react. In one case, we tried so valiantly to turn that when we looked downward we had nearly re-directed the Wii-mote back to ourselves in an accidental 180 flip. It's impossible to know if these control drawbacks were circumstantial or inherent to the game design, but given that at times the experience was very smooth and responsive we're going to give Ubi the benefit of the doubt.

Frankly, we want to give the game the benefit of the doubt because - occasional control issues aside - Red Steel could be the beginning of a great new franchise. Now that we've journeyed deeper into the game and have seen more levels as well as tried out new play mechanics, we can't help but be excited by the potential.

In the first level demoed on Thursday, we found ourselves running through a factory warehouse setting. From the very beginning we could see that Red Steel is going above and beyond the graphic norm on Wii, realizing 3D environments that are both interactive and brought to life with a host of little visual extras. Objects in the world are destructible. As we made our way through the warehouse, we came into a kitchen and shot down a half dozen hanging pans, each falling with a clang. We capped some explosive barrels, which erupted into an inferno and caved in a nearby wall. We shot out windows and sent bullets flying into fire extinguishers, which discharged their contents upon contact. Shadows from the world reflect unto walls and gunfire illuminates hallways. The final game will run in both progressive-scan and 16:9 widescreen modes. The demo sported a fluidity that hung around 30 frames per second with occasional dips.

Ubi has developed a fleshed out control scheme for the game that makes full use of the Wii-mote and nunchuck attachment. You control the main character - this nameless hero who seeks to fight off the Japanese Yakuza - with the nunchuck unit's analog stick and you aim with the Wii-mote. Compared to Metroid Prime 3's new expert mode, which offers very high sensitivity, Red Steel feels both looser and slower, but also smoother. Ubisoft reps on hand noted that in the final version we'll be able to modify the control sensitivity to our liking.

Yakuza enemies who meet their maker may leave behind useful weapons. In the two new levels, we found such firepower as a standard handgun, an Uzi, a shotgun and an assault rifle. To pick them up off the ground, we simply walked over them and shook the nunchuck attachment. The nunchuck is used in context-sensitive situations so that if we happened upon a door, we could shake it to open it or, in a later stage, it could be shaken to execute a secondary sword melee attack. (Your character can hold two blades and actually fight with both of them, not just one, in some situations.)

The D-Pad is used to cycle between weapons. Press left and the Uzi appears. Press right and it's the handgun. And, of course, shooting is done with the B-trigger on the Wii-mote, which feels very natural. Ubi has implemented an intuitive zoom feature in which you can hold the A button and gesture forward with the Wii-mote in order to gain a zoomed view of enemies. This makes precision aiming easier, but when zoomed the reticule moves across the screen much slower and hence the character is more open to attack, which is the trade off. When our special meter was full, we could quickly gesture forward to go into a bullet-time-like slow-motion mode, whereupon we could target and disarm foes in a cinematic sequence.

The second level, which serves up a traditional Japan atmosphere complete with old Geisha houses and fewer neon lights, was noticeably more difficult as enemies came at our character with guns blazing. In order to get the jump, we stealthily made our way through a second-level passageway that looked down on a courtyard below, zoomed forward with the A button and Wii-mote, and sniped a Yakuza member in the head with our gun, disposing of him with a single shot. Then, of course, we ran full force at any nearby enemy and let our guns do the talking. We nearly got ourselves killed before we made it through a sliding door and into sword battle with one of the more powerful Yakuza threats.

Swordplay feels more refined than ever. We found ourselves parrying attacks simply by motioning left with the nunchuck and with our enemy open we could make a swiping motion with the Wii-mote to deliver damaging cuts. The game does not show blood, which is strange considering that swords do, in fact, cut people. Even so, these blade matches are improved and we can fully grasp their potential.

The latest levels in Red Steel were more impressive than ever and we're hopeful that the control accuracy will ultimately remain consistent so that it may match the title's ambitious gameplay fundamentals, creative level designs and moody atmosphere. We highly recommend that readers check out the new gameplay trailer of Red Steel in motion.

------------------------------------------Origen

Gamepro.com
Nintendo's hawking the Wii's appeal to the inexperienced masses, but that doesn't mean you'll have to say "sayonara" to M-rated games.

Forty-eight inches of razor-sharp steel flashes viciously a mere hair's width from your face, and for a millisecond, time stands still. Fortunately, you keep it together just enough to instinctively raise the wakizashi [short sword] in your left hand. The brief, nasty-sounding whisper of a metallic scrape let's you know you correctly countered the feint almost before you feel the vibration of your foe's katana glancing your defense.

But he's made a mistake! Making a quick sidestep, you find the opening in his stance. Suddenly a tattoo-emblazoned shoulder becomes a target, and you quickly bring your hand downward for a diagonal slice. He's cut! Then in one fluid move you flick your wrist upwards to reverse the motion of your sword, aiming low and across his midsection. Your enemy drops to his knees and stops ... defeated.

Now the moment of truth. You extend your arm forward, the point of your blade aimed at his head. The Yakuza soldier remains down but raises his weapon in surrender. Life or death...his fate--and the Wii controller--is in your hands.
Red Steel Kills

Ubisoft is embracing the Wii with plans to bring an M-rated, modern day Japanese yakuza adventure to the system's launch party this fall. Much has been reported about Red Steel, but like all Wii games you can't really know what it's like until you try it. According to creative director Nicolas Eypert at Ubisoft's Paris studio where Red Steel is being developed, "The best thing is that you don't feel constrained by the controller anymore. Your hands feel free. After a while you totally forget that you're holding a controller and you can play in a much more relaxed way than you can with a standard controller."

The Wii's nunchuk and remote set up puts Japanese katana and wakizashi at your command along with a deadly arsenal of handguns, machine guns, and shotguns. You'll also use sniper weapons and toss grenades, and don't worry, Ubisoft is holding back a few surprises, too.

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Clanes

-Las Cicas Shibuya
-El Clan Financiero
-El Clan Tradicional
-Familia Oyabun
-Game Fight Clan

Imagenes [New Images 18-8-06]

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NOTA: Algunas imagenes son Atworks - Editado por los comentarios de Ruben_DS y CaVaYeRo

Videos

GameProTV
E3 2006: Press Conference
E3 Off-screen (Demo In-Game)
E3 Conference Demo
Sword Fighting (La Lucha de la Espada - Demo In-Game)


Enlaces

Red Steel en MeriStation - Red Steel in IGN - Red Steel in GamePro - Red Steel en GameSpot - Red Steel in the Wikipedia - Red Steel en RevoGamers - Red Steel en Vandal - Red steel dans Jeux-France - Red Steel en Foros de Juegos (ZonaForo Meristation)[0 Temas - 0 Mensajes]

Play.com
Price: 79.99 (Estimacion por causas de venta)
Review (Un poco mas abajo en la pagina): Red Steel is an exclusive Wii launch title that takes full advantage of the console's innovative controller and puts players directly into the action-packed first-person experience with the weapon in their hand - literally.
An engaging storyline unfolds as you learn that your fiancée has been kidnapped and her father - a Japanese mafia kingpin - murdered by a rival gang. The only way to save your loved one and defend your honor is to journey from Los Angeles to Japan and confront the Tokyo underworld. By learning the ancient art of Japanese fighting with your katana and the focused precision of modern firearms, you will progress and adapt yourself to this foreign environment, where skills alone may not guarantee you victory.
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Amazon
Price: Price: $49.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping. Details
Platform: Nintendo Wii - ESRB Rating: Rating Pending - Media: VideoGame

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Game
Códig: 043039 - Sistema: Wii - Fabricante: UBISOFT - Tipo: ACCION - Lanzamiento: ---- - Disponibilidad: ---- - Precio: --- - Disponibilidad: No esta disponible en ningun comercio
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NOTA IMPORTANTE: No me hago cargo del hype, de las compras incoscientes, ni de las desilusiones...


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jedi_luis HARENA TIGRIS

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Buen post ;)
Aunque eso de que sale el 20 de Noviembre de donde lo has sacado??? :?

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Amuriasx PARIETINAE UMBRA

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Post curradisimo. Este juego me lo pillo de lanzamiento.

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Ruben_DS PARIETINAE UMBRA

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Espectacular post, lo único malo es que deforma algo el foro.... pero tampoco pasa nada.

Espero este juego con ansias!! :D

________________________________
Mi foro, soy G4NONDORF:

http://market.crearforo.com

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aBsTrAcTo Stinger

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Si, si, se me habia olvidado que cambiaron la fecha y lo pusieron de lanzamiento.

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Redrum_217 PANDORA

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Impresionante trabajo ABSTRACTO.

Un 10 para ti.

Talueeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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CaVaYeRo IGNIS EXCUBITOR

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Hola. Me apunto al tema "el post deforma el foro", por favor, cambia las imgs grandes.

Si te sirve de ayuda, te adjunto el avance de revogamers, así como las noticias relacionadas. Por cierto, esa fecha de salida no es definitvia, ni mucho menos ;)

Avance RedSteel (22 de mayo)

Unas cuantas noticias:

¿Sangrará Red Steel?

Roman Campos Oriola habla sobre Red Steel y la potencia de Wii

Nuevos detalles y capturas de Red Steel

Ubisoft libera los movimientos de la katana de Red Steel

Nuevas imágenes

¿El multiplayer de Red Steel nos enfrentará cara a cara a nuestro enemigo?

Red Steel es más barato que los juegos de PS3

Red Steel: La Narración (basado en las notas de prensa de Ubi, descripción de algunos detalles del argumento que no vienen en el avance previo.

La espada sonará en tu mano con Red Steel

Algunas actualizaciones de imágenes no han representado noticia, pero veo que tienes un buen repertorio.

Un saludo a todos. Gran POst!

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aBsTrAcTo Stinger

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Hola. Me apunto al tema "el post deforma el foro", por favor, cambia las imgs grandes.

 

Si te sirve de ayuda, te adjunto el avance de revogamers, así como las noticias relacionadas. Por cierto, esa fecha de salida no es definitvia, ni mucho menos ;)

Imagenes puse algunas en grande para que se pudieran apreciar sin pinchar, pero si preferis de la otra manera vale. Y lo de la fecha era por poner algo, y ya que estaba la noticia, pues...

 

Algunas actualizaciones de imágenes no han representado noticia, pero veo que tienes un buen repertorio.

 

Un saludo a todos. Gran POst!

Bueno las imagenes de las noticias O:) Las ponia para acompañar :-D

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NeoDraKKaR Héroe del Tiempo

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Sobre el link de ¿Sangrará Red Steel?: eso está anticuado y se ha contradicho por el propio diseñador del juego no? Red Steel no tendrá heridas ni sangre.

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CaVaYeRo IGNIS EXCUBITOR

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Hola. Me apunto al tema "el post deforma el foro", por favor, cambia las imgs grandes.

 

Si te sirve de ayuda, te adjunto el avance de revogamers, así como las noticias relacionadas. Por cierto, esa fecha de salida no es definitvia, ni mucho menos ;)

Imagenes puse algunas en grande para que se pudieran apreciar sin pinchar, pero si preferis de la otra manera vale. Y lo de la fecha era por poner algo, y ya que estaba la noticia, pues...

 

Algunas actualizaciones de imágenes no han representado noticia, pero veo que tienes un buen repertorio.

 

Un saludo a todos. Gran POst!

Bueno las imagenes de las noticias O:) Las ponia para acompañar :-D

jeje tranki, lo de las imagenes te lo decía por las que se selan del ancho, y lo de

 

Algunas actualizaciones de imágenes no han representado noticia, pero veo que tienes un buen repertorio.

no lo digo por tí, sino por mi! jaja

 

me refiero a que no siempre que han salido nuevas imágenes, se ha publicado una nueva noti en revogamers, pero que ya veo que has recopilado bastantes ;)

 

Ah, ya vi lo de la fecha :P

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CutterSlade23 IGNIS EXCUBITOR

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Ehhhh ya era hora! de tener un Post oficial de este juegazo, jeje. Gracias aBsTrAcTo por recopilar tanta información, aunque alguna este en ingles :P .

Solo me cabe una duda, al ver cierto video se vé que el protagonista puede mover la cámara pero siempre que mueve la pistola. Lo que quiero saber es si la cámara se puede mover sin necesidad de llevar pistola u otra arma, imagino que sí e incluso lo doy por hecho, pero me ha asaltado esta duda absurda y hasta que no lo pregunte no estoy tranquilo.

Por otra parte que AMBIENTACIÓN consigue la gente de Ubisoft en sus juegos, es que es para darles un 10!!.

Salu2! y un post muy completo, ojala y hubiera más gente igual de dispuesta a organizarse tan bien como el autor de este Post.

Pd: Gracias por avisar por mensaje privado.

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MI BLOG

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Ruben_DS PARIETINAE UMBRA

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Ehhhh ya era hora! de tener un Post oficial de este juegazo, jeje. Gracias aBsTrAcTo por recopilar tanta información, aunque alguna este en ingles :P .

 

Solo me cabe una duda, al ver cierto video se vé que el protagonista puede mover la cámara pero siempre que mueve la pistola. Lo que quiero saber es si la cámara se puede mover sin necesidad de llevar pistola u otra arma, imagino que sí e incluso lo doy por hecho, pero me ha asaltado esta duda absurda y hasta que no lo pregunte no estoy tranquilo.

 

Por otra parte que AMBIENTACIÓN consigue la gente de Ubisoft en sus juegos, es que es para darles un 10!!.

 

Salu2! y un post muy completo, ojala y hubiera más gente igual de dispuesta a organizarse tan bien como el autor de este Post.

 

Pd: Gracias por avisar por mensaje privado.

 

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MI BLOG

Ya, seria genial tener un post oficial del SSBB, TLOZ: TP, etc.

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